Tag Archives: Gerhard Richter

Self Portrait with Dylan and Aviators

Psychologically dangerous territory for me to put my picture about, I don’t like it but it seemed appropriate to end this rather banal blog week of incognito-ness. I’ve tried to make this as much after Richter* as possible by setting … Continue reading

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Gerhard Richter

Answer the question, are you intending to cut or raise funding for oil paint in tubes? And are there to be quotas for EU painters in our galleries and studios? Abstraktes Blid (1994)

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Dylan’s litter

I have this picture pinned to the wall behind my desk and I look at it every day and every day I think how well the breeder did to get six pups into some sort of order on a canvas … Continue reading

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Dragging paint across a board

Abstract Painting, 1994, Gerhard Richter When I was painting and decorating, I used to love to run one colour over another like this. We called it ‘distressing’ in the mid-eighties when we used it as a technique for making new … Continue reading

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Gerhard Richter

Is up there with my absolute favourite painters. He is that rare thing, a virtuoso in several fields. He does expressive abstraction like the picture below, he is probably the best photorealist alive, and then he does hard graphic work … Continue reading

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Youth portrait

A likeness of the young Ulrike Meinhof from the sequence of fifteen paintings October 18, 1977 by Gerhard Richter, one of the great photo-realist painters. It’s like a school photo, a bit. That’s one thing I like about it.

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You’re putting that on upside down, mate

this was the most common expression that wags used to come out with when I was painting and decorating, when wags were ‘wits’ rather than Cheryl Tweedy. My masterpiece at Art School was a 30 ft long 10 ft high … Continue reading

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