A work of Art

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It has sculptural form. This condition, though permanent, is always on the change, depending on the position of the subject: you. You do not feel small in the streets and sidewalks as you might expect, because the grid is always opening a new perspective a different vanishing point and the sky, and because the avenues are wide. The immense physical three-dimensionality encourages your soul to expand rather than contract – you are a brave Mother having the courage to walk around here, and you are a cool fucker too, lounging around a coffee stand on the corner of 37th and Lex smoking a Strike as if you were a close personal friend of Robert de Niro. Does it seem as though there is something missing? Not so much as it seems that there is something known.

The narrative of 9/11crosses your mind often. America may be an Imperialist Culturalist bastard, but only those stripped of senses could fail to appreciate the beauty of Manhattan, and only the gruesome dogma of the fanatic could have you walk a block, hear the accents and music of thirty different nationalities and still believe that by crashing a plane into a building you were attacking anything other than your own sense of self-loathing.

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13 Responses to A work of Art

  1. Mark Elt says:

    You bin reading Tom Wolfe again?

  2. Stephen Foster says:

    I’ve never read Tom Wolfe. What does he get on about?

  3. Mark Elt says:

    He’s a gonzo turned fop who wrote about That New York in The Bonfire of the Vanities.

    There was summat gonzo about what you just wrote.

  4. johnny n says:

    oooh has he been to new york? he should have said

    🙂

    was jack’s rothko unobsession better or worse than elt’s?

  5. Stephen Foster says:

    Jack’s unobsession was more sober.

    I was impressed with his view of a teacher who was showing the kids around even dodgier art made of pots and pans and string at the Whitney: Look at him, trying to convince them this means something. Loser

  6. OS. says:

    Aktewally, Boy, those shots is very good. The bottom one is almost Atlantis-like: very futuristic. There’s a paradox there somewhere but I’m not ejukated enough to work it out.

    The top one is almost foreboding. Is this what humanity has become? Steel cylinders and blocks of concrete. It goes against all my senses of what humanity is about. I can sense what it would be like if a virus killed all the world’s population. That would be our epitaph. The idea sends a shiver through me. When we’re all shmuck, I don’t want to be thought of by visitors to our planet that we were all clones and drones living in blocks of concrete.

    Right, Boy, am up to decanters and dead man’s bling in the book. Your mum seems to be the only sane person in it up to yet. 😉

    Gee-Goss.

  7. mum says:

    TYVM Os You are so right !!!!! Lol Lol xx I now have a Spainstokie in Malaga my first message friend how exiting is that ! Love to all x

  8. OS. says:

    Mum. XXX

    winger, have finished the book. My eyes are so bad I’m walking about like that bloke in Last of the Summer Wine with the thick glasses. I keep bumping into open doors. It was worth it though if only for ammunition. I’ll send you my thoughts privately. They might embarrass you. 😉

    M. le etc.

  9. Stephen Foster says:

    There was a very good review in the Daily Mail. I don’t know what I’ve done to deserve it :–)

    ‘Foster’s memoir is in formed by a sharp self-critical intelligence and by a real anger.’

    And there’s more where tht came from: It was Book of the Week!

  10. Stephen Foster says:

    There was a very good review in the Daily Mail. I don’t know what I’ve done to deserve it ;–)

    ‘Foster’s memoir is informed by a sharp self-critical intelligence and by a real anger.’

    And there’s more where that came from: It was Book of the Week!

  11. chiffs says:

    So good he said it twice ; )

  12. OS. says:

    “And there’s more where that came from: It was Book of the Week!”

    And so it should be. I reckon this book is your real coming-of-age, winger, Boy. Get touting it in The Valleys and up the Yorkshire coalfields. You’ll do a bomb up there. The downside is that Norman Tebbit will have a fatwah out on you, and, if she’s not too addled-brained to read it, it will see the final demise of the Black Witch of Grantham. 😉

    Oh dear! 🙂

  13. marian martin says:

    I have met your mum – yes – but I haven’t read your book. So I will decide about the sanity after I have read it.

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